Liturgical tradition and progress not opposed, pope says

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VATICAN CITY (CNA/EWTN News) — Pope Benedict XVI told participants at an international liturgical conference that tradition and progress are not opposites, but complimentary parts of Catholic life and worship.

“Not infrequently are tradition and progress in awkward opposition,” he told attendees of the Ninth International Congress on the Liturgy, sponsored by the Pontifical Liturgical Institute.

“Actually, though, the two concepts are interwoven: tradition is a living reality that, in itself, includes the principle of development, of progress.” more…

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Finding the right words is a sacred work

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Part Four: Liturgical Change

By FR. LEROY CLEMENTICH, CSC

CatholicAnchor.org

Friends, inasmuch as you will soon be receiving an abundance of information regarding the proposed revisions to the Roman Missal, you may simply wish to ask the obvious question: “Just what is the Roman Missal and what does it contain?” Essentially, the Missal is a book or collection of prayers, intercessions and blessings along with directions or rubrics. The central element in that collection, of course, is the Eucharistic Prayer itself, also referred to as the Anaphora or Canon, which is all of one piece assembled around the sacred words of Jesus over the bread and wine at the Last Supper.

The Missal has had a long and involved history, developing gradually into the form that we know today. In the early church, of course, there were few service books either for the presider or the assembly. Christians knew certain fundamental Christian prayers by heart like the Lord’s Prayer, the Gloria Patri and other short doxologies (expressions of praise to God) drawn from the letters of Saint Paul the apostle. more…

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Over time, words of the Mass have changed

Part Three: Preparing for the new translation of the Mass

By Fr. LEROY CLEMENTICH, CSC

Catholic Anchor.org

This column will continue our observations on the reality of change in human history and in the church’s life of prayer.

Throughout its history, the church has discovered a variety of ways to express its faith and forms of worship. Indeed, human words, in whatever form they appear, are not set in stone; they consistently lend themselves to deeper understanding and ways of expression. Human speech is fluid, dynamic rather than static. The human mind continually struggles to make clearer for itself those objects that come into its vision. It is simply part of the mind’s make-up. Hardly any wonder then that over the centuries people of faith have found more satisfying ways to express what they believe. more…

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Preparing for the new Mass translation (part 2)

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Change & Liturgical Change

By Fr. LEROY CLEMENTICH, CSC

Catholic Anchor.org

It has often occurred to me, as I am sure it has to you, my friends, that life in this world must often seem utterly unpredictable, indeed, even terrifying and perilous. There seems to be such a small margin of opportunity to direct the course of our life in ways that seem purposeful and predictable. Surely, it is not by accident, therefore, that we should make every effort to find or devise ways to keep safe and secure those elements in our lives that give credibility and reason for our daily existence. more…

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Preparing for the new Mass translation (Part 1)

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By Fr. LEROY CLEMENTICH, CSC

CatholicAnchor.org

It has been common news among Catholics over the past year that the Holy See would approve a revised English-language edition of the Roman Missal. It will become official throughout the Catholic world on the First Sunday of Advent, November 27, 2011. In the meantime, bishops have urged pastors and others responsible for the liturgy to engage their parishioners in an ongoing series of catechetical instructions so that all may be prepared to worship together fully and actively.

Anchorage Archbishop Schwietz wishes to use the Catholic Anchor as one source of such pastoral instruction. The material that will appear in these pages over the next few months has already become available in other liturgical publications. I wish to express my appreciation beforehand, therefore, to those authors upon whose works I will draw for these articles. May our common worship be enhanced and God be glorified therein. more…

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